network monitoring
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Learning programing want to help!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3

    Learning programing want to help!

    I'm learning Python. I have never programed anything before except my watch and car radio. I heard that Python was simple to learn programmming with.
    Is it capable of writing powerful programs? Does anyone know it limitations?
    Could Python make the same program that C+,C++, or C could make?
    I want to make all sorts of programs from keyloggers to Antivirus/Spyware/Adware Software to other usefull programs. Is Python able to make such programs possible or do I need to learn a new lanuage? Thanks for your help!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,651

    well

    For the most part, Python has very few limitations, or limitations that make little difference unless your trying to program a huge complex program, like an OS.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,053
    Quote Originally Posted by stl_rn
    I'm learning Python. I have never programed anything before except my watch and car radio. I heard that Python was simple to learn programmming with.
    Is it capable of writing powerful programs? Does anyone know it limitations?
    Could Python make the same program that C+,C++, or C could make?
    I want to make all sorts of programs from keyloggers to Antivirus/Spyware/Adware Software to other usefull programs. Is Python able to make such programs possible or do I need to learn a new lanuage? Thanks for your help!!!
    Python is an interpreted language. In that way, it can never be as powerful or fast as a compiled language like c/c++.

    Python is good as a beginner's language because it is a lot simpler than other languages. It also can be used to do most of the things more advanced languages do.

    However, you shouldn't stick with python for your whole programming life, for several reasons:
    • Everyone who runs your 'program' has to have the python interpreter.

    • It is slower than compiled languages.

    • I don't know how good it's integration into the windows API is.


    Once you've got good at programming, you should move on to a language like C, C++, or even assembly. These are the most powerful tools for programming and have huge user bases and communities surrounding them. Most programming for windows and *nix systems is done in either C or C++, and that is what all the manuals and tutorials are designed for.

    But most people can't understand advanced languages without prior knowledge, so stick with python until you learn more.

    For the most part, Python has very few limitations, or limitations that make little difference unless your trying to program a huge complex program, like an OS.
    Actually, operating systems are written in Assembly initially. Computers only understand binary machine code, so you have to work in Assembly until you can create a compiler for your operating system. Any sort of programming language is only available for use on an OS when you have a way of converting it to data that the computer understands.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3

    thanks

    Thanks for your s***estinon, I will continue to learn Python. I'm learning it from a book called "Absoulte Begenners Guide to Programming Python". The way it teaches Python is by creating games. Of course the games get more complex with each chapter. My question is, after I finesh with that book, should I continue to learn more about Python or, should I start learning C/C+/C++/C#?
    Also, what is the difference between the different C languages? Which one is closer to the English language when programming, i.e. Python?

    *Also Python is free, are any of the C languages free?*
    Thank you for your help.
    Last edited by stl_rn; 10-03-2006 at 12:26 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,651

    Well

    C++ and C are free depending on which compiler you use.

    @mike*0*
    Wasn't UNIX written in C?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,053
    Quote Originally Posted by stl_rn
    Thanks for your s***estinon, I will continue to learn Python. I'm learning it from a book called "Absoulte Begenners Guide to Programming Python". The way it teaches Python is by creating games. Of course the games get more complex with each chapter. My question is, after I finesh with that book, should I continue to learn more about Python or, should I start learning C/C+/C++/C#?
    Yes, it would be ad****ble to move on to a more powerful and complex language after ******ing python. C or C++ are both good, but not C#. C# is as un-useful as VB as a language, unless you never want to actually understand real programming.

    Also, what is the difference between the different C languages? Which one is closer to the English language when programming, i.e. Python?
    C and C++ are very similar (and backwards-compatible, because C++ is just an advancement of C), but C# is a language developed by microsoft and should be avoided. It's always best to develop in an open language like c/c++ so you're not tied down to one operating system. C and C++ have been around for decades; C# was only recently created by microsoft.

    If you're looking for something closer to the English language, that's what high level languages like python are for. C and C++ are going to be hard to understand at first, but that's what you get with powerful and advanced languages like that.

    *Also Python is free, are any of the C languages free?*
    Thank you for your help.
    They are languages; sets of rules. You don't 'buy' a language.

    But yes they are all open, free, and widely documented. All you need is a free compiler and you can be creating applications. Several compilers are paid-for (like MSVC++) , but the language is always free for whoever wants to develop using it.



    @mike*0*
    Wasn't UNIX written in C?
    Yes, most operating systems are widely created in programming languages like C.

    But the first-steps in the creation of the OS are always made in assembly/machine code. It is impossible to make an operating system in C when it doesn't even exist yet. You have to make the core of the OS first in assembly THEN make a C compiler for it, THEN you can make further additions in a higher level language. Compilers only work when an operating exists which it can build the code around.
    Last edited by Ezekiel; 10-04-2006 at 12:47 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    3

    thanks

    thanks for the tips. what compilers are best for coding in C/C+/C++?
    also, do i have to learn C before i learn C+/C++?
    do you know of any good books for someone who has no experience in C/C+/C++ ?
    thanks again!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by stl_rn
    thanks for the tips. what compilers are best for coding in C/C+/C++?
    do you know of any good books for someone who has no experience in C/C+/C++ ?
    thanks again!
    I use "Turbo C++ IDE". Thats usual. I believe if you get a book that teaches C++ , it comes with the program (on CD or disk). Then again my copy is like *0 years old or something (got it from my dad)...
    "Borland" is good. ( I use that too)... Unless you want to learn C++ in 2* days... Theres a book for that too.

    Toast

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    2,053
    thanks for the tips. what compilers are best for coding in C/C+/C++?
    Dev-C++ is the most widely used free C[++] compiler, and Microsoft Visual C++ is the most widely used paid-for compiler. MSVC++ offers more features, but dev-c++ is more than capable of doing the job, and it's free. I say use dev-c++/other free compiler until you are actually making applications for *****, and even then you don't necessarily have to pay MSVC++...

    Quote Originally Posted by stl_rn
    also, do i have to learn C before i learn C+/C++?
    No, they are both separate languages which you learn individually. However, C++ is a subset of C so knowledge in either will make learning the other be extremely simple.

    Also, C+ does not exist.

    do you know of any good books for someone who has no experience in C/C+/C++ ?
    thanks again!
    I learned all from online tutorials, so can't recommend any books. But you can refer to my post a few days ago for a good c++ tutorial reference:

    Quote Originally Posted by mike*0*
    The first thing I want to do is recommend these sites for learning:

    General c++:

    [url]http://newdata.box.sk/bx/c/htm/ch0*.htm[/url]
    [url]http://www.cpp-home.com/[/url]
    [url]http://www.cplusplus.com/[/url]
    [url]http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial.html[/url]
    [url]http://www.cppreference.com/[/url]

    C++ Winsock:

    [url]http://www.hal-pc.org/~johnnie2/winsock.html[/url]
    [url]http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/de...th_winsock.asp[/url]
    [url]http://www.tangentsoft.net/wskfaq[/url]

    C++ Win*2:

    [url]http://www.relisoft.com/Win*2[/url]
    [url]http://www.winprog.org/tutorial[/url]
    [url]http://www.functionx.com/win*2[/url]
    [url]http://msdn.microsoft.com/[/url]
    [url]http://www.codeguru.com/forum/showth...*#sdk_registry[/url]
    [url]http://www.codeproject.com/threads/winspy.asp[/url]
    [url]http://www.antionline.com/showthread...hreadid=2*785*[/url]

    Assembly:

    [url]http://docs.mandragor.org/files/Prog..._Tutor_en.html[/url]

    And in particular this site, because I learned a lot from it:

    [url]http://newdata.box.sk/bx/c/htm/ch0*.htm[/url]

    Also, get the windows help file because it's better than MSDN and MSDN online really sucks:

    [url]http://www.borland.com/devsupport/bo...s/BC52HLP*.ZIP[/url]

    Seriously people, if you are a C/C++ programmer get the help file. You can't program on windows without it.
    Quote Originally Posted by toast
    Unless you want to learn C++ in 2* days... Theres a book for that too.
    Yeah, that book is a great resource for learning C++. You can find it online here:

    [url]http://newdata.box.sk/bx/c/htm/ch0*.htm[/url]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    122
    I have that book on my shelf.
    Its all good.
    T

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Pascal programing
    By gani in forum Programming
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-19-2019, 09:02 AM
  2. programing language
    By Samson in forum Programming
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 04-03-2017, 09:46 AM
  3. problem in programing
    By minaadel1994 in forum Programming
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-11-2009, 04:30 PM
  4. C/C++ programing help!
    By minaadel1994 in forum Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-06-2008, 12:56 PM
  5. Programing
    By Tr_Ms in forum Programming
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-12-2007, 02:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts