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Thread: Filesystem-level encryption

  1. #1
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    Filesystem-level encryption

    Filesystem-level encryption, often called file or folder encryption, is a form of disk encryption where individual files or directories are encrypted by the file system itself. This is in contrast to full disk encryption where the entire partition or disk, in which the file system resides, is encrypted.


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  2. #2
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    General-purpose file systems with encryption

    Unlike cryptographic file systems or full disk encryption, general-purpose file systems that include filesystem-level encryption do not typically encrypt file system metadata, such as the directory structure, file names, sizes or modification timestamps. This can be problematic if the metadata itself needs to be kept confidential. In other words, if files are stored with identifying file names, anyone who has access to the physical disk can know which documents are stored on the disk, although not the contents of the documents.
    Last edited by Moonbat; 11-28-2009 at 09:09 PM. Reason: MOD EDIT - Removed spam links

  3. #3
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    Cryptographic file systems

    Cryptographic file systems are specialized (not general-purpose) file systems that are specifically designed with encryption and security in mind. They usually encrypt all the data they contain R**; including metadata. Instead of implementing an on-disk format and their own block allocation, these file systems are often layered on top of existing file systems e.g. residing in a directory on a host file system. Many such file systems also offer advanced features, such as deniable encryption, cryptographically secure read-only file system permissions and different views of the directory structure depending on the key or user.
    Last edited by Moonbat; 11-28-2009 at 09:09 PM. Reason: MOD EDIT - Removed spam links

  4. #4
    sheeba666 Guest
    File or folder level encryption (or file system level) is an encryption system where specific folders, files, or volumes are encrypted by a third-party software package or a feature of the file system itself. Here is the pros and cons of implementing the file or folder level encryption. This pros and cons taken from Tony Bradley books about PCI compliances

    Advantages

    * More granular control over what specific information needs to be encrypted can be accomplished. Items that you desire to be encrypted can be stored in a particular folder or volume, and data that does not need to be protected can be stored elsewhere.
    * Many file-level encryption products allow you to integrate access level restrictions.This allows you to manage who has access to what.
    * When data is encrypted on a file level and is moved off the storage location, it is moved encrypted.This maintains the confidentiality of the data when it is moved to a backup tape.
    * Less invasive to a database than column-level encryption.The schema of the database does not need to be modified and the access of data by authorized personnel (based on access control) is not hindered when querying and other management activities take place. This is an aspect of availability, one of the three tenets of the CIA triad.
    * Tends to consume less resource overhead, thus less impact on system performance.
    * Logging and auditing capabilities. Some file-level encryption systems offer the capability to ***** who attempts to access a file and when. Since the majority of data breaches are internal to the network, this kind of information is good to have.
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  5. #5
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    well truecrypt is a nice thing and works really great, but the container thing is a bit odd, especially when you are working with the files and already have a structure in your files / folders.

    so far efs is a bit better for non mission critical files in an existing file folder structure. but you should export your key and back it up, in case your windows installation fails.
    Last edited by Moonbat; 11-28-2009 at 09:09 PM. Reason: MOD EDIT - Removed spam links

  6. #6
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    +2 for TrueCrypt. Unbreakable. I forgot my password to a container and ran a brute force attempt at cracking it.....nothing. I ended up just doing a low level format on that drive. haha. Good thing it wasnt really anything important...just some pics of my gf
    Last edited by Moonbat; 11-28-2009 at 09:09 PM. Reason: MOD EDIT - Removed spam links

  7. #7
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    I have to go with TrueCrypt as well. I can't think of a better drive encryption tool.
    "Workers of the world unite; you have nothing to lose but your chains." -Karl Marx

  8. #8
    easellUnano Guest

    Filesystem level encryption

    Though James points out that random files in home directories including backups were deleted because of some file system error. Thanks for that. Though how am I able to find out if my filesystem has any errors/mistakes or corruptivity?

  9. #9
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    File or folder level encryption (or file system level) is an encryption system where specific folders, files, or volumes are encrypted by a third-party software package or a feature of the file system itself. Here is the pros and cons of implementing the file or folder level encryption. This pros and cons taken from Tony Bradley books about PCI compliances
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    Last edited by gordo; 12-28-2009 at 07:00 AM.

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